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10. Recent Publications

Note: Items marked with an asterisk (*) are available for review by readers. Write to the editor to request a copy.

The Non-Pama-Nyungan languages of northern Australia: Comparative studies of the continentís most linguistically complex region - Nicholas Evans (ed.) (A joint publication of the ANU Centre for Research on Language Change and Pacific Linguistics)

PL 552 The present volume brings together detailed comparative work on a number of non-Pama-Nyungan languages of Northern Australia, and is the first book-length study to span this linguistically complex region, containing as it does perhaps 90% of AustraliaŪs linguo-genetic diversity in an eighth of its land area. Many papers originated at a workshop held at the 1989 Australian Linguistics Society conference at Monash University, but several have been written specially for this volume. It has been said that no language changes faster than a proto-language, and in the intervening period a great deal of new descriptive data on non-Pama-Nyungan languages has accumulated, as well as careful sifting of complex data, which has led many of the authors to completely revise or develop their arguments since the original workshop. Hence, the delay in the appearance of the volume reflects some major shifts in position on the part of some authors.

The introduction the main issues in comparative non-Pama-Nyungan studies, and forms a state-of-the-art survey of the classification of non-Pama-Nyungan languages, which have undergone substantial changes over recent decades. It also consider the main issues in their subgrouping, and their relation to the Pama-Nyungan languages. The second to fourth sections then looks at issues of subgrouping, reconstruction and areal influence that pertain to particular non-Pama-Nyungan families or subregions. The final sections returns to the issue of whether one can carry the process of reconstruction back to deeper levels than the families themselves, that is back to some level from which all or most non-Pama-Nyungan families are descended. Overall, the volume illustrates that - despite recent claims by some authors - the comparative method can be successfully applied to Australian languages. It also furnishes a number of detailed and intricate studies of morphological reconstruction applied to complex paradigms. 2003 ISBN 0 85883 538 X x + 513 pp
Australia A$99.00 (inc. GST)
International A$90.00

Nyangumarta: A language of the Pilbara region of Western Australia - Janet Catherine Sharp
PL 556 This book is a description of the Nyangumarta language spoken by several hundred marrngu 'people' in the north-west of Western Australia. The description is based on material which the author collected between 1983 and 1997. The book includes descriptions of the phonology, the morphology and word classes including the pronominal systems. It also includes detailed descriptions of Nyangumarta main and complex clauses. Nyangumarta is of general typological interest. There are many reasons for this. Firstly, the status of word which emerges necessarily in the description of Nyangumarta verbal morphology contributes to the notion of there being a mismatch between what is regarded as a phonological word and what is regarded as a grammatical word in some languages. In Nyangumarta the paradigms of verbal pronouns illustrate a division between morphemes which are phonologically bound and those which are phonologically free; although both sets are grammatically bound to the verb. To add to this there is a class of derivational verbs which appear to be divided according to their phonological/grammatical word status. The inchoative and stative verbs are analysed as having phonological word status whereas the monosyllabic derivational verbs such as the affective and causative and the semantically 'empty' -pi are analysed as bound verbalisers. The phonological system of Nyangumarta is of interest because its productive system of vowel assimilation within the verbal morphology is one of the most elaborate of all the Australian languages.
2003 ISBN 0 85883 558 4 xix + 262 pp
Australia A$119.90 (inc. GST) International A$109.00

The Duugidjawu language of southeast Queensland: Grammar, texts and vocabulary- Suzanne Kite and Stephen Wurm
PL 553
In the late 1950s and early 1960s, before he began work on the languages of New Guinea, Stephen Wurm undertook considerable fieldwork on languages of northern New South Wales and southern Queensland. His fullest materials were on Duugidjawu, spoken just to the northwest of Brisbane, and were recorded between 1955 and 1964. Wurm was generous in making his materials available to selected researchers, and in 1997, an arrangement was made with Wurm for Suzanne Kite to write an MA thesis analysing these materials. These consisted of tapes and transcriptions, with Wurmís translations of these in his own shorthand, which only he could read. When he was in Canberra, Wurm would spend one or two afternoons each week going over these materials with Kite, explaining the shorthand and reviving his knowledge of the language. He had never written a draft grammar of Duugidjawu, but effectively had one in his head. It was hard to remember things exactly after a period of almost forty years and Kite sometimes mediated between what was on the tapes and Wurmís explications during their collaboration.Stephen Wurm passed away in late 2001, after the thesis had been approved but before this work could be published.
This is a slightly revised version of Kite's thesis. It comprises an invaluable record of the language of the Duuidjawu people, and through this of their traditions, customs and laws. It is the only substantial record of a language which differs in various respects from prototypical non-prefixing Australian languages.It has five vowels and a fair number of monosyllabic words. Pronouns and nouns referring to humans or to dogs have distinct case forms. Following the grammar sketch are all the texts recorded by Wurm and a full vocabulary and thesaurus. All Wurm's information was provided by Willie McKenzie, believed to be about eighty years old in October 1955. He died in 1965. 2004 ISBN 0 85883 550 9 xiii + 298 pp
Australia A$88.00 (inc. GST) International A$88.00

The Bunganditj (Buwandik) language of the Mount Gambier Region - Barry Blake
PL 549
A single language appears to have been spoken in a triangle that stretched from somewhere north of Lacepede Bay on the coast of South Australia across to Bordertown on the Victorian border and south to the coast where the mouth of the Glenelg in far western Victoria formed the south-eastern corner. A consideration of various references indicates clearly that the territory of the Buwandik, alternatively Bunganditj, extended to the mouth of the Glenelg and further north it extended to Coleraine and perhaps Balmoral.

Practically all our data comes from old sources. There are twelve sources of vocabulary for the language and two direct sources of grammatical information on the dialect spoken by the Booandik or Bunganditj. One source for the grammar is a sketch of three pages by D.S. Stewart; the other is a slightly longer sketch by R.H. Mathews, which exists in two forms, manuscript and published. Some further grammatical information can be obtained from the 'Mount Gambier' sentences in William Thomas' Dialogues in six dialects (details below), and a few further scraps can be gleaned from the word lists, specially from the one by Stewart which accompanies his grammatical sketch.

PL 549, ISBN (Paperback): ISBN 0 85883 495 2
Australia A$39.60 (inc. GST), Overseas A$36.00

Iísaka: A sketch grammar of a language of north-central New Guinea - Mark Donohue and Lila San Roque
PL 554
I'saka, the language of 600-plus residents of Krisa village in north-central New Guinea, is a previously undescribed language of the Macro-Skou family, which spreads across the north coast of New Guinea from the Skou villages in the west to Sissano lagoon in the east. I'saka represents the earliest split from the protofamily, and so represents a valuable source of data for comparative work in northern New Guinea. The language is endangered, with many of the younger generation switching to Tok Pisin as their language of everyday communication, but I'saka remains the language of ethnic identity and is seen as emblematic of the uniqueness of the I'saka people. The grammar of I'saka is interesting for the general linguist as well as for the New Guinea specialist, since it displays many features, some possibly unique, which will prove challenging for modern theoretical and typological linguistics. Two independent suprasegmental tiers for tone and nasality, and a lack of contrastive segmental nasals, are rare phonological phenomena. Morphologically, the language displays a paradigm of agreement morphemes that agree with non-core arguments, while leaving, in most cases, the object of a transitive clause unmarked on the verb. Special agreement marking for questioned subjects is also an unusual feature of I'saka. This sketch includes discussion of the historical relationship between I'saka and other languages in the Macro-Skou family, as well as issues of language endangerment, language maintenance, and spheres of language use. There is also a word list and a selection of short texts illustrating many of the points covered in the grammatical description. 2004 ISBN 0 85883 554 4 xvii + 131 pp
Australia A$39.60 (inc. GST) International A$36.00

Tibeto-Burman languages of Nepal: Manange and Sherpa - Carol Genetti (editor)
PL 557
The country of Nepal is home to over one hundred distinct languages from four language families. The current volume provides grammars, glossaries and texts for two of these languages: Manange, of the Tamangic branch of the Tibeto-Burman language family, and Sherpa, of the Tibetan (Bodish) branch. Each grammar provides a full description of the phonology, morphology and syntax of the language, covering both the structural and functional properties of each. The glossaries contain lists of basic vocabulary, alternate forms, and comparisons with forms given in previous literature. The short texts provide insights into how speakers weave linguistic structures to produce fluent discourse.
2004 ISBN 0 85883 535 5 xiv + 324 pp
In Australia $99.00 (inc. GST) International $90.00

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Anne-Marie de Mejia ed., Bilingual Education in South America

Multilingual Matters, 2005

Hbk: ISBN: 1853598194 pp 140,
U.K. £ 29.95, U.S. $ 54.95

This book presents a vision of bilingual education in six South American nations: three Andean countries, Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia, and three 'Southern Cone' countries, Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay. It provides an integrated perspective, including work carried out in majority as well as minority language contexts, referring to developments in the fields of indigenous, Deaf, and international bilingual and multilingual provision.

http://www.multilingual-matters.com/multi/display.asp?isb=1853598194

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